One Young World Community Dinner

One Young World community dinner went down on the eve of 19th October, 2018. The visit included 25 One Young World delegates (from Germany, Switzerland, Belize, Republic of Moldova, Singapore, Bangladesh, Ireland, Hong Kong, Spain, Belgium,The United States, Argentina, Sierra Leone, Portugal and Monaco) who were very inspirational in their thinking and demeanor. Our special visit that evening came from: Deputy Mayor Saskia Bruines, The Hague’s alderman for Education, Knowledge Economy and International Affairs. The director of The Hague Peace Projects, Jakob de Jonge welcomed the invited guests giving them a warm introduction.

One Young World 2018 delegates got to interact on with The Hague Peace Projects on a wealth of topics. Key on the discussion table were areas that focused on – peace and dialogue in various conflict areas such as : Syria, Turkey, Kurdistan, Bangladesh, The Democratic Republic of Congo – DRC, Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, Sudan and Somalia. The evening gave the One Young World delegates in attendance, clear insights of dealing with conflict areas by the use of various projects centered on education and culture, media and journalism and research and advocacy. An emphasis on clarity to the situation on ground were demonstrated by selected speakers.

In attendance were the founders of the Yangambi Foundation – Angélique Mbundu and Dady Kiyangi, Katrina Burch of the Hague Hacks, Ewing Ahmed Salumu– Congolese Journalist, Valentin Akayezu- Human Rights Lawyer and Activist, Alena Kahle – Bangladesh- work group writer.

Catering credits  went to Ya_Laziz Catering who made sure the One Young World delegates had a delightful feast and pleasant ambience.

Images right below:

Valentin Akayezu Human Rights Lawyer, addressing the crowd.

One Young World delegates

Ewing Ahmed Salumu, Congolese expert journalist and Angelique Mbundu, founder of Yangambi Foundation

 

Angelique Mbundu, OYW delegate and Dady Kiyangi

 

Deputy Mayor of The Hague, Saskia Bruines and Jakob de Jonge, Director of The Hague Peace Projects.

One Young World delegates listening in to the address.

 

OYW delegates have a chat before their last course.

Smiles that tell it all. ( From the left: Jakob de Jonge, Dir. The Hague Peace Projects, OYW delegates and Deputy Mayor of The Hague, Saskia Bruines.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Justin Kabika Congolese expert (right) and OYW delegate for Belize, Kylah Ciego.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Catering initiative, Ya Laziz, that savored the OYW diner’s taste buds – Instagram handle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Catering Credits: Ya Laziz

#Ya_Laziz_ Catering

@YaLazizCatering

 

Menu

——

Starters

Lentil soup with Turkish bread

Main Course

Yoghurt & cucumber

Moussaka

Rice, biryani flavor + nuts

Fatoush, Syrian Salad

Dessert

Mhalabe

Traditional rice pudding!

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Guest Program :

7.30pm – Guests coming in – Welcome refreshments

7.45pm – Welcome word ( Dir. The Hague Peace Projects – Jakob de Jonge)

–  Special honor visit  ( Deputy Mayor,The Hague – Saskia Bruines)

7.50pm –  Starter course – 1st presentation at the end the course – (Kitchen/Restaurant Team) – (Mohammed, Yasmine and Linde -welcome and-Ya Laziz- project background)

8.10pm– Dinner- (main course) – Hello and welcome mention from our team at Hague Peace Projects end the course

– Hague Hacks – Katrina

-Ewing, Valentine ( diaspora influence) + special guest : Angelique Mbundu and Dady Kiyangi  -iAfrica Film Festival and Yangambi Foundation-iAFF

-Green economy- Alena Kahel

9.00pm – Dessert + tea/coffee

9.10pm – Question and Answer session + Interactions (OYWs + The Hague Peace Projects Team)

-The question of and quest of/for Peace

-Green economy

-Talking change

-The Hague Hacks -technology + justice and peace

9.55pm– Vote of thanks ( Jakob de Jonge)

10.00pm– Guests leave at their own leisure

 

 

 

 

 

 

Narratives of hatred and division might drastically change the Indian elections

By Alena Kahle

It’s a Wednesday evening, and a group of Master’s students from The Hague’s International Institute for Social Sciences has organized a get together at The Bookstore Café. Chairs are pulled together under the books stacked up to the ceiling, and a crowd pours in. Indian students are chatting with their fellow batchmates, and are eager to provide insight into a politically divided world they have left behind physically, but by far not mentally.

In April 2019, the Indian populous will vote for its direct representatives. Whatever party wins most seats will effectively run the government, drive policies, and decide the direction the country will take. But even despite the vast diversity that exists in the party horizon, options are limited. The political left is fragmented, and the main opposition, so it is claimed, is led by a man incapable of presenting himself in the right way.

The students’ narrative takes the listeners on a journey: When in the last elections the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) took over, hopes were high. The general electorate was carried away in the euphoria coming out of the election campaign, and nationalism surged not because of hatred for outsiders, but because of pride for the own success. This nationalism has turned. One student vividly describes the nature of television and news, and explains how they feel every message being published is designed to support the ruling majority in fear of being otherwise shut down. Ostensibly political TV debates, if they are not government-narrated, have turned into one big reality TV show. Being a true Indian patriot has become synonymous with supporting economic growth at all costs, and the ruling party has already banned Greenpeace and is shutting down any group that favours promoting social justice over excessive growth.

In this election campaign, the strength of the BJP, the ruling party, seems to be that its “growth-first” policy is at first glance uplifting the life quality of many. But its true strength, the evening shows, is the BJP since winning the last elections has fostered a narrative of societal division. One student describes BJP as a corporation more than a party, which throughout its current rule has managed to bond its voters while marginalizing its opponents through its narrative.

The students are worried. They raise issues of anti-Muslim hatred, and one student brings up that they feel history is being rewritten to paint Muslims as invaders of the culture, and to promote Hindu unity, in a country where diversity fuels hospitality. The evening has taken a turn from just being about politics. It has expanded to encompass a worrying change in society. The elections in April 2019 are bound not only to decide whether divisions have managed to become deeply entrenched in society, but also whether politics will continue to tackle problems that are not those in need of being addressed.

Over thirty thousand people of Indian origin live in The Netherlands, with its largest group living in The Hague.[1] Compared to the population of 1.3 billion India itself had in 2016, this number might appear small, but those abroad have proven to make their voices heard, and address concerns about their country’s future to the world.[2]

As author, I have communicated with the organizers of the event to confirm that the article did not misinterpret comments made at the event. I therefore hope to have accurately portrayed the opinions and current events in India. The live stream of the video can be found at https://www.facebook.com/international.scholas/videos/502272256955036/

[1]  CBS StatLine – Population; sex, age, origin and generation, 1 January”. statline.cbs.nl. Retrieved 15 September 2016.

[2] “World Population Prospects: The 2017 Revision”ESA.UN.org (custom data acquired via website). United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. Retrieved 10 September2017.

Vredessymposium 21 September

On the 21ste of September, International Peace Day, the umbrella organisation Vredesmissies Zonder Wapens, will organize a peace symposium where they honour three young peace activists as peaceheroes (vredeshelden). One of them is our very own colleage Tayfun Balçik!

We are very proud with this nomination! If you want to be part of this historical moment, please send an email to: vredesmissieszonderwapens@gmail.com

Read the full program here in Dutch

Date: 21 September
Location: City hall, Grote Kerkplein 15 Zwolle
Time: 13:00 – 18:00

#WeWantJustice

Protests led by youth are met with violence;

attempts of dissent are suppressed.

In Bangladesh, mass outrage over two teenagers killed in a road crash escalated into a social movement, with high school students stepping out on the streets, holding placards demanding for road safety and the resignation of the Shipping Minister, Shajahan Khan. Shajahan Khan’s insensitive remarks about the death of the students sparked the outrage. Road safety is a major issue of concern in Bangladesh. Research indicates that last year more than 4200 people lost their lives in road accidents in Bangladesh.

Over the past few days, several images and videos have gone viral on Facebook, which testify to the allegations of brutal violence committed by the police and the Bangladesh Chhatro League (the student wing of the Awami League). BCL has been accused of thrashing and molesting journalists. On Saturday, August 4th, mobile internet was suspended for 24 hours and many complained about a lack of connectivity. Many believe this was done to suppress the dissent, since the issue was not being covered enough by local media and subsequently protesters and supporters of the movement went online to share updates, using Hashtags and tagging international media houses’ social media accounts. Many social media influencers reported that they received thousands of emails and messages from Bangladesh. Some social media influencers, including Drew Binsky, uploaded videos expressing their solidarity and concern.

Shahidul Alam, a renowned photographer and social activist, told Al Jazeera that the movement is not solely being driven by the demand for road safety: other issues too are causing public dissent. The latest update that Shahidul Alam was detained—as reported by Dhaka Tribune—has since been shared by many people on social media. However, according to Dhaka Tribune, the police have denied these allegations. Earlier the same day, Aparajita Sangita, an online activist, was detained but released afterwards—as confirmed from her Facebook account.

We, at the Hague Peace Projects, express our solidarity with the youngsters and condemn the attempt to suppress the voices of dissent through brutal violence, arrest and the suspension of the internet. 

References:

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/08/bangladesh-officials-restrict-internet-student-protests-180805071428323.html

https://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2018/08/05/btrc-no-directive-issued-to-suspend-broadband-internet-service

https://bdnews24.com/bangladesh/2018/07/31/minister-shajahan-khan-apologises-for-insensitive-remarks-about-deaths-of-students-in-crash

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/08/bangladesh-mass-student-protests-deadly-road-accident-180802174519088.html

https://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/dhaka/2018/08/05/photographer-shahidul-alam-picked-up-from-his-home

https://www.facebook.com/drewbinsky/videos/1859932040710383/

GLR August Meet-Up Facing Burundi

On August 31,  Great Lakes Region Monthly Meeting theme is centered on : ‘Facing Burundi’

Topical discussion surrounding the situation of the Great Lakes region with emphasis on Burundi

This event will include:

–       A historical background of the political crisis of Burundi

–       The common misunderstanding of happenings within Burundi

–       Solidarity and mobilization among Burundians

–       How the diaspora and international community can contribute

–       An hour for question & answer session

 

 

June Recap:

Brief aan minister Blok over situatie in de Rif

De Tweede Kamer der Staten-Generaal
Vaste commissie Buitenlandse Zaken
De Lange Poten 4, 2511 CL Den Haag
Aan de minister van Buitenlandse Zaken
drs. S.A. Blok
Amsterdam, 28 juni 2018

Geachte heer Blok,

Vandaag vindt in de Vaste Commissie Buitenlandse Zaken het Algemeen Overleg Marokko plaats. Tijdens dit overleg zal de situatie in Marokko en de Westelijke Sahara aan de orde komen. Zoals u wellicht heeft vernomen zijn eergisteren rond middernacht de vonnissen van de Riffijnse gewetensgevangenen in Marokko uitgesproken. Vonnissen variërend tussen 2 en 20 jaar celstraf, zie bijgesloten bijlage voor een overzicht van de vonnissen. Vonnissen die ons, de families van de Riffijnse gewetensgevangenen in Marokko voor de rest van ons leven hebben getekend. Vanuit de Marokkaanse gemeenschap juichen wij uiteraard elk debat dat tot doel heeft om de situatie in Marokko te verbeteren toe. Echter willen wij een aantal kanttekeningen plaatsen bij onder andere
uw brief van 21 juli jongstleden en stilstaan bij uw toekomstbeeld als vertegenwoordiger van de Staat der Nederlanden over Marokko.

In uw brief geeft u aan dat Nederland een speciale band heeft met Marokko in verband met de ca. 400.000 Nederlanders met Marokkaanse wortels. Echter, deze groep Marokkaanse-Nederlanders wordt grotendeels gevormd door Marokkanen die hun wortels hebben in de Rif. Een regio dat tot vandaag de dag stelselmatig wordt onderdrukt en achtergesteld. In april heeft u een werkbezoek gebracht aan Marokko om onder meer aandacht te vragen voor de situatie in de Rif, helaas hebben wij u weinig horen zeggen over de situatie van uw collega’s Kati Piri en Lilianne Ploumen die twee weken voor uw bezoek de toegang tot de stad Al Hoceima zijn ontzegd en hun werkbezoek vroegtijdig moesten verbreken. Ook vinden wij het jammer dat u zelf niet een bezoek heeft gebracht aan de Rif om de situatie met eigen ogen te zien. Wij zijn dan ook verbaasd over het aantal zinnen dat u in de brief heeft toegewijd aan de situatie in de Rif. En in het
bijzonder de mensenrechtenschendingen in de regio.

Mensenrechtenschendingen

Zoals u weet wordt de Rif (de omgeving rondom de stad Al Hoceima) al bijna twee jaar gemarginaliseerd en onderdrukt door de centrale overheid. Meer dan 2000 onschuldige burgers voornamelijk jongeren moesten het ontgelden. Een deel daarvan heeft zijn celstraf uitgezet, anderen zijn weer in voorarrest. De arrestaties en ontvoeringen zijn echter niet gestopt en gaan tot de dag van vandaag ongestoord door. Voor ons is het onbegrijpelijk dat u kansen ziet in een land dat (inter)nationale wetgeving en verdragen meermaals heeft geschonden. Verschillende mensenrechtenorganisaties hebben meerdere keren gerapporteerd over de structurele martelingen, verkrachtingen, mishandelingen en vernederingen die de gevangenen hebben moeten doorstaan. Amnesty International heeft op 22 juni 2017 gerapporteerd over de mishandelingen van onder andere de protestleider Nasser Zafzafi. Ook Human Rights Watch heeft op 5 september 2017 gerapporteerd over de mensenrechtenschendingen door de politieagenten, de schendingen zijn zelfs bevestigd door de medische rapporten van de Marokkaanse mensenrechtenraad National des Droits de l’Homme (CNDH) waar de heer Al Yazami de voorzitter van is. De medische rapporten zijn echter nooit openbaar gemaakt.

De protestleider Nasser Zafzafi zit al meer dan een jaar in eenzame opsluiting, een schending dat alle boekjes te buiten gaat. Volgens Artikel 44 van ‘The United Nations Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners’ mag een gevangene niet meer dan 15 dagen opeenvolgend in de isoleercel verblijven. Amnesty International heeft op 28 november 2017 haar zorgen geuit over de toen 176 dagen die Nasser Zafzafi in de isoleercel heeft doorgebracht. Dat houdt in meer dan 22 uur zonder contact met medegevangene, beperkte vrijheden en in een kleine en onhygiënische ruimte verblijven. Ook de persvrijheid en vrijheid van meningsuiting waar Nederland veel waarde aan hecht worden in Marokko meermaals geschonden. Meerdere journalisten zijn sinds de protesten in de Rif opgepakt. De Marokkaanse autoriteiten blokkeren door juridische en fysieke intimidaties elk kritisch geluid van binnenlandse en buitenlandse journalisten. In the World Press Freedom Index staat Marokko van de 180 landen op de 135ste plek, een land dat in 5 jaar tijd twee plaatsen is gezakt als het gaat om de persvrijheid. Hoe kan Nederland op alle terreinen breed willen investeren in een land dat haar eigen democratische waarden niet respecteert?

Subsidiegelden

Het is goed om te lezen dat Nederland voornemens is om te investeren in de economische ontwikkeling van Marokko, minder fijn is om te zien dat dit soort investeringen nauwelijks of deels ten goede komt aan de juiste doelgroepen. Marokko kent nog altijd een hoge corruptie-index. Verder valt ons op dat Nederland ervoor kiest om projecten te starten in de ontwikkelde steden van Marokko zoals Rabat en Tanger. Zoals wij aan het begin van de brief hebben aangegeven komt de grootse groep Marokkaanse Nederlanders uit het hart van de Rif, het gebied dat door onze ouders is verlaten omdat het economisch erbarmelijk aan toeging. Het is zeer spijtig om in uw brief te lezen dat Nederland steeds dezelfde fout maakt, namelijk de kloof tussen de ontwikkelde steden zoals Rabat en Tanger waar de Orange Corners worden gevestigd en de steden die de subsidiegelden het hardst nodig hebben groter wordt gemaakt. Wij vinden het ook jammer dat Nederland de subsidie voor het Shiraka-programma dat onderdeel is van het Nederlandse Fonds voor Regionale Partnerschappen (NFRP) dat ten doel dient het bevorderen van het democratisch bestel in de MENA-regio met vier jaar is verlengd tot 2022. Het is vooral spijtig omdat het geld zelden wordt geïnvesteerd in projecten in de Rif of terecht komt bij de juiste mensen. Naar ons mening dient Nederland toezicht te houden en onderzoek te doen naar alle projecten in Marokko die zij financieel ondersteunt en erop toeziet dat het geld ook toekomt aan de kwetsbare steden in de Rif.

Vervolgstappen

In uw brief stelt u vast dat Marokkaanse Nederlanders zich geen zorgen hoeven te maken om gearresteerd te worden in Marokko, mits zij de Marokkaanse wetgeving niet overtreden. Hetzelfde hebben wij vernomen van de Nederlandse Ambassadrice in Marokko mevrouw Bonis. Wij de familieleden van de gewetensgevangenen worden direct en indirect via onze familieleden in de gevangenis bedreigd en geïntimideerd. Om die reden maken wij ondanks de garanties vanuit de Marokkaanse autoriteiten ons zorgen over ons lot. Zolang deze mondelinge toezegging op geen enkel juridische grondslag is berust en wordt ondersteund, zullen wij ons onveilig voelen. Wij hopen dan ook dat u mede namens de Minister voor Buitenlandse Handel en Ontwikkelingssamenwerking de Marokkaanse autoriteiten zal vragen om deze mondelinge toezegging hard te maken.

Verder willen wij graag van u weten of u op de hoogte bent van de valse beschuldigingen van de Marokkaanse autoriteiten richting de Riffijnse activisten? Namelijk dat zij worden beschuldigd van separatisme. Een beschuldiging waar volgens de Marokkaanse wet levenslang op staat.

Tot slot zijn wij benieuwd naar uw vervolgstappen inzake de situatie in de Rif. Wat kunnen de Marokkaanse Nederlanders van u concreet verwachten? Tevens hopen wij als bezorgde Nederlandse staatsburgers met Marokkaanse wortels met u als minister van Buitenlandse Zaken in gesprek te gaan. Uiteraard hopen wij op korte termijn een uitnodiging van u te mogen ontvangen.

Hoogachtend,

Namens de families van de Riffijnse gewetensgevangenen in Marokko.
Farida Houdoe – Zus van protestleider gewetensgevangene Abdelali Houdoe in de gevangenis van Oukacha te
Casablanca
Imad Maghouh – Broer van Mohamed maghouh gewetensgevangene in de gevangenis van Oukacha te Casablanca
Ibrahim Iamrachen – Broer van gewetensgevangene Mortada Iamrachen gevangenis in Taza
Oualid Mallorca – Neef van de protestleider Nasser Zafzafi in de gevangenis van Oukacha te Casablanca

Overzicht vonnissen uitgesproken door de rechtbank te Casablanca tegen de Riffijnse
gewetensgevangenen op 27 juni 2018.

1. Nasser Zafzafi 20 jaar
2. Mohamed Elmajjaoui 5 jaar
3. Nabil Ahamjik 20 jaar
4. Mohamed Jelloul 10 jaar
5. Samir Ighid 20 jaar
6. Mahmoud Ahannouch 15 jaar
7. Rachid Aamarouch 10 jaar
8. Mohamed Asrihi 5 jaar
9. Elhaki 15 jaar
10. Zakaria Adahchour 15 jaar
11. Bilal Ahabad 10 jaar
12. Jamal Bouhaddou 10 jaar
13. Achraf Elyakhloufi 5 jaar
14. Othman Bouzian 3 jaar
15. Mohamed Naimi 3 jaar
16. Anas Elkhattabi 2 jaar
17. Fahim Ghattas 2 jaar
18. Mohsin Athari 2 jaar
19. Rabie Ablake 5 jaar
20. Youssef Elhamdioui 3 jaar
21. Ilyas Elhaji 5 jaar
22. Mohamed Elhani 3 jaar
23. Chakir Elmakhrout 5 jaar
24. Salah Lakhchem 10 jaar
25. Ibrahim Bouzian 3 jaar
26. Badr Boulahjal 2 jaar
27. Ahmed Elhakimi 2 jaar
28. Abdelaziz Khali 2 jaar
29. Jamal Mona 2 jaar
30. Fouad Saidi 3 jaar
31. Jaouad Sabiri 2 jaar
32. Jaouad Benzian 2 jaar
33. Ibrahim Abeqqouy 5 jaar
34. Soleiman Elfahili 5 jaar
35. Karim Amghar 10 jaar
36. Ahmed Hazzat 2 jaar
37. Mohamed Meggouh 2 jaar
38. Mohamed Elmahdali 3 jaar
39. Abdelali Houdoe 5 jaar
40. Hassan El Idrissi 5 jaar
41. Omar Bouhras 10 jaar
42. Wassim El Bousattati. 20 jaar
43. Abdelkhair Elyasnari 2 jaar
44. Abdelhak Sadik 2 jaar
45. Monaim Asartiho 2000 Dirham

Remembering Shahzahan Bachchu

Rest in Peace

Maybe I’m No Human*

By Nirmalendu Goon, Translation by S M Maniruzzaman

 

Maybe I’m no human, humans are different;
They can walk, they can sit, and they can wander room to room
They are different; they are afraid of death, scared of snakes.
Maybe I’m no human. Then how can snakes raise no fear within me?
How can I go standing alone all day long like a tree?
How can I sing no song watching a movie?
How can I go without drinking wine with ice?
How can I pass a night without closing my eyes?
Indeed I feel strange when I think about
The way I go alive from morning to eve.,
From eve to night.
When I’m alive,
I feel strange.
When I write,
I feel strange.
When I paint,
I feel strange.

 

Maybe I’m no human;
If I were a human,
I’d have a pair of shoes of my own,
I’d have a home of my own,
I’d have a room of my own,
I’d get warmed in the embrace of my wife at night.
On the top of my belly my child would play,
my child would paint.

 

Maybe I’m no human;
Were I a human,
Why do I laugh
When I see the sky empty like my heart?

 

Maybe I’m no human
Humans are different;
They have hands, they have nose,
They have eyes like yours
Which can refract the reality
The way prisms refract light.

 

Were I a human,
I’d have scars of love on my thigh,
I’d have the sign of anger on my eye,
I’d have a mother,
I’d have a father,
I’d have a sister,
I’d have a wife who’d love me,
I’d have fear of accidents or a sudden death.

 

Maybe I’m no human; If I were a human,
I could not write poems to you,
I could not pass a night without you.
Humans are different; they are afraid of death,
They are afraid of snakes,
They flee away when they see snakes;
Whereas instead fleeing away, mistaking them as my friends
I approach them, embrace them.

 

 

Secular humanists and LGBT activists and publishers continue to be persecuted in Bangladesh for their free speech. On June 11th, 2018, Bengali poet and free thinker, Shahzahan Bachchu, was shot dead in Munshiganj district, at Kakaldi, near Dhaka. Shahzahan was a political activist, a former general secretary of the Munshiganj district unit of the Community party, an outspoken secularist, a published poet and a writer of books on humanism. He is also the founder of the Bishaka Prakashani (Star Publishers) publishing house, which specialises in poetry. Shahzahan was sitting at a tea stall in Kakaldi, his home village, when four men on motorcycles rushed at him. He was killed immediately. Shahzahan was previously at risk, living in hiding after receiving death threats from militants and fanatics, through phone calls and messages.

 

Since 2013, dozens of others, like Shahzahan, have been targeted and killed by Islamist extremists, for their secular non-Muslim views. The government has been slow to respond or condemn this violence. Since 2015, the reported murders and attacks for secular views have included the deaths of Avijit Roy, Washiqur Rahman, Ananto Bijoy Das, and Niloy Neel (friend of Shahzahan, who was murdered just days before him). Government officials, including the prime minister, Sheikh Hasina, blame these attacks on the victims themselves, for their criticism of religion. Secularists are held by the government under the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Act, which has recently been expanded upon – and allegedly has been misused – for the criminal prosecution of ‘blasphemous speech’ that ‘hurts religious sentiments,’ as well as for any criticisms that are made against governmental actions or policies.

 

Along with PEN AMERICA, we support this urging of the authorities to investigate and do justice; we support this urging for no more impunity by the government. Reporting from the IHEU Freedom of Thought Report (Bangladesh chapter), the IHEU President, Andrew Copson, said:

We are devastated that the spectre of violence has returned to the freethinking community in Bangladesh. Every humanist writer and secular activist and freethinking publisher who has been killed in recent years has been a defender of the rights of others, a lover of humanity and reason and justice. Their murders stand against all these universal values. We once again call on the government of Bangladesh to root out the Jihadi networks perpetrating these crimes, and on the international community to bring pressure to bear on Bangladesh to protect and defends its humanists and human rights defenders.

 

 

Cross-posting from:

https://iheu.org/freethinking-writer-politician-shot-dead-bangladesh/

https://pen.org/press-release/murder-of-secular-publisher-and-writer-shahzahan-bachchu-an-attack-on-free-expression-in-bangladesh/  

https://www.thedailystar.net/frontpage/bangladesh-ict-act-the-trap-section-of-57-1429336 

https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/maybe-i-m-no-human/

 

World Refugee Day 2018

 

Refugee protection under threat: In search for new strategies

 

Refugee protection is under threat. The refugee crisis of 2015 has created anxiety and resentment among host populations and changed the political landscape of many European countries. Right wing and centrist political parties have scapegoated refugee communities to push their nationalist agendas. Challenging the 1951 Geneva Convention has become salonfähig with even mainstream political parties. People have been sent back to war torn countries like Iraq and Afghanistan.

How can we turn the tide? In what way does the political discourse on the refugee crisis resonates with the day to day experience of newcomers and local communities?

During this program we will discuss with a.o. Tineke Strik ((Senator and Professor on migration), Valentin Akayezu (lawyer) and Palwasha Hassan (Don’t Send Afghans Back) what is at stake, but more importantly discuss strategies of change on an institutional and foremost individual level. How can we create sustainable long-term solutions for refugees arriving and residing in Europe? Merlijn Twaalfhoven, composer, activist and founder of The Turn Club, will guide the audience in a creative manner towards making individual commitments for the near future.

With a performance by Kamerkoor JIP and Syrian singer and musician Wasim Arslan.

This program is a collaboration of the The Hague Peace Projects, Music and Beyond Foundation, The Turnclub and De Balie.

 

 

De bescherming van vluchtelingen staat onder grote druk. De vluchtelingencrisis van 2015 heeft niet alleen geleid tot veel maatschappelijk onrust, maar ook daadwerklijk het politieke landschap van veel Europese landen veranderd. Vluchtelingen zijn gebruikt als zondebok door rechtse partijen om hun nationalistische ideologie op de agenda te krijgen. Het openlijk in twijfel trekken van de handhaving van de Geneefse Conventie van 1951 wordt niet meer gezien als extreem, maar is zelfs salonfähig geworden bij partijen die zich in het politieke midden bevinden. Mensen worden zonder pardon terug gestuurd naar conflictgebieden als Afghanistan en Irak.

Hoe kunnen we het tij keren? Op wat voor manier verhoudt het politieke discours over de vluchtelingencrisis zich tot de dagelijkse ervaring van nieuwkomers en lokale gemeenschappen?

Tijdens World Refugee Day gaan we in gesprek met o.a. Tineke Strik (lid Eerste Kamer en universitair docent migratie), Valentin Akayezu (rechtsgeleerde) en Palwasha Hassan (Don’t Send Afghans Back) over wat er op het spel staat vanuit een politiek en juridisch perspectief. Daarnaast gaan we met elkaar in gesprek over wat voor strategie er nodig is om het politieke en maatschappelijke tij te keren op een institutioneel, maar vooral ook op individueel niveau. En, wat is er op de lange termijn nodig om op een duurzame manier vluchtelingen in onze maatschappij op te nemen?

Merlijn Twaalfhoven, componist, activist en oprichter van de Turnclub gaat met het publiek in gesprek over de manier waarop je op een creatieve en effectieve manier als individu een verschil kan maken.

Met muziek van Kamerkoor JIP en de Syrische zanger en musicus Wasim Arslan.

Dit programma is een samenwerking van The Hague Peace Projects, Music and Beyond Foundation, The Turnclub en De Balie.