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The 2018 General Elections in the DRC – What next?

The 2018 general elections in the Democratic Republic of Congo, held on 30th of December, were set out to determine a successor of the long-standing president – Mr. Kabila (Wembi 2017). As a matter of fact, power transfer has never undergone a peaceful process in Congo. In this regard, Mr. Kabila, who ruled as of 2001, attempted with all his might to obstruct the democratic voting processes in the country. The 2011 election which he purportedly won in a legitimate manner, were widely unpopular and considered as mockery and corruption. His last term in office was expected to come to a final end in 2016. However, even when it expired, Kabila did not leave his riling position. Instead, he decided to shift public attention to the chaos in the country and cite it as the primary reason for the government’s inability to organize elections. Thereafter, he consolidated his grip of power for two more consecutive years and ruled against postulations in the Congolese national constitution, while ruthlessly murdering and slamming down pro-democratic movements and demonstrations (The Economist 2019).

In the context of the 2018 general elections in the DRC, Félix Tshisekedi (Union for Democracy and Social Progress) was found out to win the votes on the 10th of January with an overwhelming turnout of 38,6% of the total vote, surpassing his oppositional candidates Martin Fayulu and Emmanuel Ramazani Shadary. Importantly, Mr. Fayulu, who was second in the voting turnout, asserted that the vote was set up hastily and was absolutely not representative of the popular political affiliation. He then moved to challenge the outcome of the elections in the Constitutional Court of the DRC. The state’s influential Roman Catholic Church took his side claiming that the official voting turnout was not compliant with the results of its own observations. In this regard, the Church had deployed nearly 40,000 election monitors which, as stated, “place Fayulu as the winner” (Burke 2019). Thereafter, the Constitutional Court came up with a decision on the 19th of January declaring that Fayulu’s challenge to the outcome will not be taken into consideration and shall thereby be deemed invalid. As a result, the victory of Mr. Tshisekedi was upheld and conceived of as indisputable and final.

In relation to the other oppositional leader – Mr. Shadary, prior to the vote, opinion polls revealed an evident popularity of the opposition candidates against Mr. Shadary himself, who was backed by the ruling People’s Party for Reconstruction and Democracy. He was seen to offer nothing but a continuation of the present grievances facing the country – widespread poverty, rebel cruelties such as rapes and robbery which go unpunished due to ubiquitous corruption and negligence of the officials and government. Nevertheless, Mr. Shadary possessed indisputably advantages as measured against the backdrop of his opposition. That is to say, he instilled fear and terror in voters by commanding police to threaten people with physical violence unless they casted their vote in his favour. What is more, police blocked oppositional campaigns’ marches in the capital and installed presence of soldiers in the Eastern regions, wherein the latter would forcefully “convince” voters to vote for Shadary: “They were telling people that if they did not choose him, they would be stopped and beaten” (The Economist 2019).

Despite the concerted efforts on part of Fayulu and Shadary with their trusted appointees, Félix Tshisekedi was appointed as the 5th President of the DRC on the 24th of January 2019, marking the first, purportedly peaceful transition of power in the state since it gained its independence in 1960 from its former colonizer – Belgium (Burke 2019).

 

References:

Burke, Jason. “Congo Election Runner-up Rejects Tshisekedi Victory as ‘Electoral Coup’.” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 10 Jan. 2019, www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jan/10/congo-election-felix-tshisekedi-declared- winner-in-contentious-result.

“Congo’s Flawed Vote.” The Economist, 5 Jan. 2019, pp. 26–27.

Wembi, Steve. “Uncertainty as DRC Sets Election Date to Replace Kabila.” GCC News | Al Jazeera, Al Jazeera, 9 Nov. 2017, www.aljazeera.com/news/2017/11/uncertainty- drc-sets-election-date-replace-kabila-171109074747003.html.

10 & 11 November: Great Lakes Region Conference ‘Women and Men in Peacebuilding

On the 10th and 11th of November we will host for the third time the annual Great Lakes Region Conference. The first edition (the root causes of conflict) in 2015 and the second (the role of media in conflict and peacebuilding) in 2016 were very successful and therefore we would like to continue and invite you for the coming conference. This year we focus on the role of women in the peacebuilding process in the great lakes region. Unfortunately, it is women that are still the victims of conflict rather than the carriers of peace and change.

The Great Lakes Region in Africa (Burundi, Rwanda, Uganda and DR Congo) is one of the most vulnerable and unstable regions in the world. In the region armed conflicts have evolved for decades and human rights violations are commonplace.
Rape, torture and murders of women and girls of all ages have reached epidemic proportions since 1994. Violence against women has become a deliberate strategy of war. However, women are not just victims, they also play an important social role, they contribute to peace and stability. To create a future in a war torn society, women are an indispensable basis.

With this conference, we want to strengthen trust between men and women from this region and among women themselves so that they are able to work together for peace.

Full program:

Day 1| Friday, 10 Nov.: Women & Men in Peacebuilding: Why Gender?

13:00-18:00

13:00-13:30        Registration (tea and coffee available)

13:30-13:45         Welcome and Opening – Jakob De Jonge

13:45-14:15         Keynote 1: Peace & justice [in French] – Evelyne Ombeni

14:15-14:45         Discussion: Why Gender? Why Peace? Dr. Helen Hintjens 

14:45 – 15:15       Keynote 2: Le Mouvement des Femmes et des Filles pour la paix et La securite aux Burundi. Why is this important? [in French] – Anésie Nkanira

15:15: 15:45        Tea and coffee break

15:45 – 17:30       Women at the negotiation table. Should men be invited!? Deogratis IrambonaMarie Chakupewa – Hayinchte Muhorakeye – Antionette Mutesa –  Godefroid Nimbona – Marie Nagadya, Moderated by Sophie Kwizera

17:30 – 17:45       Round up and summary reporting of key insights of the day

17:45 – 19:00       Drinks & Networking Butterfly Bar, ISS,

 

Day 2| Saturday, November 11th: Women and Men in Peace Building – What Can Be Done Different?

09:30 – 10:00       Start (tea and coffee available)

10:00 – 10:15       Recap and Welcome – Jakob de Jonge

10:15 – 11:00       Peacebuilding from a gender and development perspective – Dr. Anthony Otieno Ong’ayo

11:00-11:30         Debate: Lobby platform: 1325 the UN Resolution on Women, Peace and Security

11:30-11:45         Coffee break

11.45-12:15         Women, development & stability in Rwanda – Gloria Uwishema

12:15 – 12:45       Gender and Reconstruction in post-conflict DRC – Marie Chakupewa

12:45 -13:45        Networking Lunch – Kenyan Delicacies

13:45-14:45         Art workshop-The influence of art in peacebuilding – (Creating Rights- Fiana. Gantheret, Justin Kabika)

14:45-15:45         Debate: Our seat at the Peace Table: women of the Great Lakes Region –  Christine Among(Uganda), Marie Balagiza (Congo), Anesie Nkanira (Burundi), Yvette Muhire (Rwanda)

15:45-16:45         Group discussions: Case studies: Moving towards an inclusive and peaceful Great Lakes Region? Future perspectives.
Rwanda: Chaired by:      Sophie Kwizera
Burundi: Chaired by:       Deogratis Irambona
Uganda: Chaired by:       Moses Atacon
Congo: Chaired by:         Bashi Cikuru

16:45-17:00         Closing remarks

17:00 -17:30 Dance performance by Jean Claude Mihigo (Ballet Ukwezi)

17 :30 -18:30 Networking Bites and Drinks –  Kenyan Delicacies

 

Where: Institute of Social Studies, Kortenaerkade 12, The Hague
When: 10 & 11 November
Free tickets, but registration required: Reserve here!

Unmask the dictators from the Great Lakes Region

Tijdens de Nacht van de Dictatuur, presenteren wij het programma: Unmask the dictators from the Great Lakes Region

De Great Lakes Region is een zoetwatergebied in het oostelijk deel van Afrika waar de landen Rwanda, Burundi, Congo, Uganda, Tanzania, Zambia, Sudan en Kenia deel van uit maken. Het is een regio met veel (postkoloniale) problemen en autoritaire regimes. Tijdens Unmask the Dictator zullen enkele sprekers uit een aantal van deze landen vertellen over hun persoonlijke ervaringen met het leven onder een dictatuur. Lukt het jou om aan de hand van hun verhalen te ontdekken over welke dictators het gaat? Test je kennis en maak kennis met mensen die aan een dictatuur zijn ontkomen.

Unmask the Dictator is een samenwerking van ProDemos en the Hague Peace Projects.

© Foto: Anneke Verbraeken

Waar: Prodemos, Hofweg 1-H, Den Haag
Wanneer: 8 september
Tijd: 21:30

Koop hier je kaartje!

Declaration and Plan of Action on the role of diaspora media in peacebuilding in the Great Lakes Region

Pour traduction française, voir ci-dessous

 The Hague Peace Projects (HPP) in conjunction with International Institute of Social Studies (ISS) recently concluded the second edition of Diaspora Conference on the Great Lakes Region with the main theme: “The role of media in conflict and peace building”.

The 3-day conference on November, 24, 25 and 26 attracted bloggers, media workers, teachers, advocates, activists, artists, peace workers, students and NGO workers.

The conference is a continuation of the broader mission of The Hague Peace Projects to create and facilitate a positive environment in which the Diaspora communities can contribute to peace building processes through dialogue among all parties encouraging violent conflicts in their home countries.

This year’s conference topic was “The role of media in conflict and peacebuilding” Jakob de Jonge, the director of The Hague Peace Projects convened the debate with the subject of the role of media in conflict and peacebuilding. Many of the contributors reflected on the role of Diaspora media in peace-building in the African Great Lakes region.  One delegate said: ‘This conference is like a blanket; we are getting warm already’.

The delegates encouraged a common shared vision of building a Great Lakes Diaspora media initiative which can work for peace, preach against hate, prevent violence and influence the social and mainstream media to help spread the word!

Moving forward to the next year’s conference, 3 key points were identified as the priorities to be addressed:

  1. Unity in Diversity
  2. Engagement and Responsibility
  3. An Action Plan for the Great Lakes Diaspora Media
  1. Unity in Diversity

We have common historical experiences of war and violence. We can learn a lot from the past, and from one another to inform our future. We do not wish to be messengers of hate.  This conference was a fact check for us. Whenever someone from Uganda or Burundi mentioned challenges, someone from Rwanda or Congo would share a similar experience. This helped to bring us together. Mutual understanding among us requires sensitivity to hurts and hopes of everyone: Burundians, Rwandans, Congolese, Ugandans, Tanzanians, indigenous people, women, youth and (social) media workers and audiences. We learned some lessons about unity in diversity in Africa Great Lakes Diaspora (social) media:

The conference also served as a reminder not to forget the situation of the indigenous people of the Great Lakes region, especially the Batwa. As the first people in the region, we should use media to promote the indigenous people’s right to land, to culture, and to a dignified existence. We can do this through ensuring they have fair representation in our Diaspora media, including in social media.  Indigenous people have taught us about how to live with our environment, and their knowledge should be valued, for future generations.

  1. Engagement and Responsibility

Blaming and hate speech trigger violent actions on the ground. Our responsibility is to prevent and avoid misuse of media for politically violent philosophy of “The end justifies the means “marked with motives for political and commercial manipulations of media expression. We should look at media as an instrument that needs to deal with the facts and not the opinions. And the media should try to remain impartial. If neutrality or impartiality were like colors, then these are the colors the media should wear when it informs and communicates with the public.

We should not assume that others in the rest of the world know better than we do how to make progress. We want to defend what is best in (social) media; solving problems and reporting responsibly. As one delegate said, media is like a Hammer; tools that can destroy or can mend and help solve problems.  We in Diaspora (social) media connect Great Lakes Diaspora with people in the region. This gives us some special responsibilities in strengthening the role of media in peace-building.

Our reporting should recognize that indigenous people are often the first victims of violence and of war. Diaspora media should draw attention to the situation of this group

We meet to:

  • Recognize journalists in the Great Lakes Diaspora media, and in the region who have tried to ensure balanced reporting;
  • Acknowledge those who have paid with their lives for media freedoms, and support others who live in fear, also in Europe;
  • Support the challenge of countering false information and hate speech;
  • Report on violence and conflict in the Great Lakes region in a balanced way;
  • Move away from political reporting to economic and social affairs;
  • Address issues so that people can solve their own problems where possible;
  • Avoid irresponsible insults, harsh judgments and partial truths that can incite violence.
  • Strive for fairness in reporting, including in social media.
  1. Action Plan for Diaspora Media

We need to remind policy makers in Europe that they should consult with the Great Lakes Diaspora communities in Europe. Whether they are NGO or government seeking to promote rule of law in the Great Lakes region, or the IND seeking expertise in the region, the voice of the Diaspora should inform them. We should lobby them through our programs to enable to Diaspora to contribute to good governance, peace building and accountability in the region. Diaspora people have many skills they can contribute to ensuring that NGO and government interventions help avoid conflict and polarization. They can also help advise private companies, and agencies concerned to promote peace and development in the Great Lakes region.

We propose this Action Plan to unite us in our diversity in practical and responsible ways.

The main planned actions are listed here:

  • To create a database of Diaspora (social) media organizations and individuals, especially those working on peace and justice issues;
  • To encourage (social) media practitioners to mentor and train others in responsible (social) media;
  • To agree on basic guidelines for peace journalism for Great Lakes Diaspora;
  • To use Diaspora media to raise the visibility of the need to end violence;
  • To show that conflict is a means of getting rich and securing political office in the African Great Lakes region;
  • To learn lessons from experiences in Africa and Beyond; we were inspired by Diaspora actions in Geneva for peace and justice in Eritrea;
  • To value the diverse languages of the Diaspora;
  • To establish Diaspora TV and Diaspora radio, for peace and balanced reporting.
  • To seek training opportunities, for example in peace journalism and non-violence, for those in Great Lakes (social) media.
  • To seek independence from political agendas and politicians;
  • To ensure we lobby to be consulted by NGOs, government and private firms about policies and programs in the Great Lakes region.
  • To ensure media attention for the rights and voices of indigenous people, women, and youth in the Great Lakes region and the Diaspora.

As well as journalists, those who use social media are part of the media.  They are central to this action plan, alongside professional journalists and those who work in radio, TV, the press, and who maintain on-line blogs and websites.

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The Hague Peace Projects

Communiqué de presse:

Sujet: Déclaration et plan d’action de la conférence sur « le rôle des médias dans les conflits et la consolidation de la paix dans la région des Grands Lacs en Afrique » qui avait eu lieu le 24-25 & 26 Novembre 2016

En collaboration avec l’Institut des Sciences Sociales (ISS), The Hague Peace Project a réalisé une seconde édition de conférence-débat avec la diaspora des Pays des Grands-Lacs sur le thème « Rôle des médias dans les conflits et la consolidation de la paix ».

Tenue dans les bâtiments de l’ISS, cette conférence-débat de trois jours a commencé le 24 novembre et s’est terminée le 26. Elle a attiré non seulement des professionnels des médias et des blogueurs mais des enseignants aussi, des étudiants, activistes des droits humains, artistes, des artisans de paix et même des ONG. La qualité des orateurs, tel que souhaité et invité par Jacob de Jonge, directeur de The Hague Peace Project, était basé non seulement sur leurs connaissances et expériences dans le domaine des médias mais aussi sur leurs pays de provenance dont la plupart venait des pays en conflits et où les médias avaient joué un rôle crucial.

Faisant suite à la mission de HPP, cette conférence s’était fixée l’objectif de faciliter un dialogue entre les différents membres de la diaspora et de permettre un environnement favorable d’échanges d’idées pour la consolidation de la paix dans leurs pays d’origine fragilisés par plusieurs sortes de conflits.

Trois points-clés avaient été identifiés comme priorités qui devaient figuraient à l’agenda de the Hague Peace Project au cours de l’année prochaine :

  1. L’unité dans la diversité
  2. L’engagement et la responsabilité
  3. Un plan d’action pour les médias diasporiques de la région des Grands Lacs

1.Unité dans la diversité

Nous, la diaspora, avons des expériences en commun, surtout de la guerre et des violences. Nous sommes prêts à apprendre du passé des uns et des autres. Nous ne voulons pas être des messagers de la haine. Pendant cette conférence nous nous sommes confrontés à la réalité. Chaque fois qu’un participant parlait des défis de l’Ouganda ou du Burundi, une tierce personne du Rwanda ou Congo partageait une expérience similaire. La compréhension mutuelle entre nous, demande de la sensibilité à nos souffrances et à l’espoir de chacun : Burundais, Rwandais, Congolais, Ougandais, Tanzaniens, populations autochtones, femmes, jeunes, et utilisateurs des réseaux sociaux et publics. Nous avons appris quelques leçons sur la diversité des médias et réseaux sociaux de la diaspora des Grands Lacs.

La conférence nous a aussi rappelé de ne pas oublier la situation des peuples autochtones de la région, spécialement des Batwa. En tant que premiers habitants de cette région, nous avons le devoir d’utiliser les médias pour promouvoir leurs droits à la terre, à la culture et à la dignité humaine. Nous devons assurer le reportage de ces sujets dans les médias diasporiques et les réseaux sociaux. Les peuples indigènes nous ont enseigné comment vivre avec notre environnement pour cela leur savoir doit être valorisé et protégé pour les futures générations.

  1. Engagement et responsabilité

Les accusations et les discours de haine conduisent à des actions violentes sur le terrain. Il est de notre responsabilité en tant que diaspora de prévenir et éviter des mauvais usages des médias dont les philosophies politiquement violentes de “ la fin justifie les moyens” incitent à la haine et aux conflits interminables. Il faut éviter l’usage de manipulation pour des motivations politiques et commerciaux. Nous devons considérer les médias comme un instrument qui gère des faits et non pas des opinions. Les médias doivent essayer de rester impartial. Si neutralité et impartialité étaient des couleurs, ceux-ci seraient les couleurs que les médias doivent mettre en informant et communiquant avec le public. Nous ne devons pas assumer que d’autres personnes dans le reste du monde savent mieux le genre et la nature des conflits dans nos pays que nous-mêmes. Nous voulons défendre le meilleur des médias et réseaux sociaux ; résoudre des problèmes et rapporter de manière responsable.  Un délégué a dit : les médias sont comme un marteau ; un outil pouvant soit mener à la destruction soit aider à la résolution des problèmes ». Nous, en tant que diaspora, faisons le lien entre les médias diasporiques et nos populations dans la région. Ceci nous accorde une responsabilité spéciale dans la promotion et le renforcement du rôle des médias dans la consolidation de la paix.

Nous nous sommes rassemblés pour :

  • Faire connaissance avec les journalistes des médias diasporiques de la région des Grands Lacs, des personnes qui essayent d’assurer un reportage équilibré
  • Reconnaître ceux qui ont payé de leur vie à cause de leur engagement pour la liberté des médias et supporter d’autres qui vivent dans la peur, aussi même en Europe
  • Combattre la fausse information et les discours de haine
  • Rapporter sur les violences et conflits de la région des Grands Lacs d’une manière équilibrée
  • S’éloigner de rapports politiques et converger vers des sujets économiques et sociales
  • Adresser des sujets pouvant permettre à nos populations de résoudre leurs problèmes si possible
  • Éviter des insultes irresponsables, jugements sévères et vérités partiales qui peuvent inciter à la violence,
  • Favoriser la tolérance entre nous quelle que soit la nature de nos conflits au pays,
  • Faire tout notre possible pour garantir l’impartialité des médias et des réseaux sociaux.
  1. Plan d’action pour les médias diasporiques

Nous devons rappeler les responsables politiques qu’ils doivent consulter les communautés de la diaspora de la région des Grand Lacs en Europe. Aussi, les ONG et gouvernements qui veulent encourager un état de droit dans la région des Grands Lacs sont encouragés à parler avec les membres de la diaspora afin de recevoir des informations sur la région. Aussi les indépendants qui cherchent de l’expertise dans la région peuvent être informés par la diaspora. Nous devons exercer une pression par la promotion de nos programmes et ainsi contribuer à la bonne gouvernance, à la consolidation de la paix et aux responsabilités dans la région. La diaspora a beaucoup de compétences qu’elle veut utiliser pour veiller à ce que les interventions des ONG et gouvernements soient aidées à éviter les conflits et la polarisation. Ils peuvent aussi aider à conseiller des entreprises privées et organismes travaillant dans le domaine du développement et de la consolidation de la paix dans la région.

Nous proposons ce plan d’action pour nous réunir dans la diversité.

Les principales initiatives sont énumérées ici :

  • Créer une base de données de tous les médias diasporiques et individus, spécialement ceux travaillant sur les focus liés à la paix et justice
  • Encourager les acteurs des médias sociaux à guider et former d’autres personnes sur l’usage des médias sociaux de manière responsable
  • Parvenir à un accord concernant des lignes directrices d’un journalisme éprit de paix
  • Utiliser les médias diasporiques pour augmenter la visibilité et nécessité de terminer la violence
  • Montrer que le conflit est un moyen pour s’enrichir, accéder et assurer un pouvoir politique dans la région des Grand Lacs en Afrique
  • Apprendre des actions de l’Afrique et de la diaspora : l’expérience de la diaspora érythréenne et les actions de paix et justice qu’ils ont organisées à Genève nous ont édifiés au cours de notre séminaire
  • Apprécier la diversité des langues de la diaspora
  • Etablir des programmes télévision et radio de la diaspora pour promouvoir la paix à travers un reportage équilibré
  • Chercher des possibilités de formation pour journalisme de paix et de non-violence, pour les acteurs des médias sociaux
  • Chercher à maintenir l’indépendance des agendas politiques et politiciens
  • Veiller à ce que nous soyons consultés par des ONG, gouvernements et entreprises privées concernant leurs programmes dans la région des Grands Lacs
  • Assurer que les médias fassent attention sur les droits et voix des populations indigènes, femmes et jeunes dans la région.

Ainsi que les journalistes , les personnes qui utilisent les réseaux sociaux font partie des médias. Ils jouent un rôle central dans ce plan d’action ensemble aux cotés des journalistes, ceux qui créent des programmes de radio, télévision, presse écrite et ceux qui maintiennent des blogues en lignes et sites Internet.

En conclusion, de nombreuses personnes ont participé et contribué à la réalisation de notre conférence débat sur le rôle des médias et de la diaspora sur les conflits et la consolidation de la paix dans la région des Grands lacs. L’un des participants a déclaré : « Cette conférence est comme une couverture, nous sommes déjà en train de nous réchauffer ». Tous les participants ont soutenu une vision commune pour établir une initiative des médias de la diaspora originaire de la région des Grands Lacs. Cette initiative doit supporter le travail pour la paix et lutter contre la haine afin de prévenir les violences et les conflits dans la région.

La Haye

26 novembre 2016

African Peace Party

Peace is more than only talking, we need to connect on different levels. For that reason we organize an African Party with food, drinks, music and of course our best dance moves!

The African Party will take place in the evening of the third day of the Conference, on the 26th of November. The Hague Peace Projects will host the second Great Lakes Conference on the 24th, 25th and 26th of November with the main theme ‘the role of media in conflict and peacebuilding’. The first day will focus on the general function of media, the second day on experiences with media in conflict or peacebuilding and the third day will connect diaspora and media.

We invite all participants and friends to join this evening at the African Party where there will be free drinks and African music. The musician Fabrice will be performing for us on his guitar and after dinner there will be a DJ.

The Party takes places from 7 PM at Paviljoensgracht 20, The Hague. We hope to see you there!

Discussion about ‘Diaspora, Dialogue and Peace’ on Afrikadag

On Saturday 5th of November The Hague Peace Projects participated in the ‘Afrika Day’ which took place at the Royal Tropical Institute (KIT) in Amsterdam. Our Great Lakes Region Project held the workshop titled ‘Diaspora, dialogue and peace’. Around 40 people joined the session.

The workshop began with a short introduction on some of the issues faced by each country in the Region.

The Democratic Republic of Congo was represented by Marie-Louise Balagizi and Bejamin Kalumire. Marie-Louise talked about the importance of prioritising security which would as a consequence facilitate people’s engagement. The unsafe situation is limiting people’s possibility to change the status quo, this fosters passivity which keeps the regime in power. People need to understand that they have the power to stop it. Therefore, the mind-set needs to be changed but in order to facilitate such process the security levels have to be raised. A step in this direction is by keeping the discussion open on where the weapons are coming from. Benjamin continued on the issue of security giving his view on a non-confrontational strategy which aims at fostering dialogue between the people and the military.


img-20161105-wa0012-2Deogratias Irambona discussed the current security issue in relation to his country Burundi. He stressed the importance to stop foreign countries from supporting undemocratic regimes. As an example he mentioned that The Netherlands has been financing the security forces of Burundi for many years and that these same forces are currently involved in murders and human rights violations. In this way the Netherland is also responsible.


Rwanda was represented by Sophie Kwizera. She underlined the importance of dialogue not only about the past but also the future. She pointed out the fact that the diaspora should be more active and express their option about the issues affecting their country. She also highlighted the importance of the youth as essential element for change.

Moses Atocon from Uganda continued with a personal perspective to his country, Uganda. He talked about the harsh time he experienced growing up under Idi Amin’s regime and how such events fuelled his desire for change. This change has to be achieved through a peaceful people-led movement. This is the aim of the Kampala based NGO Activists4change, with which he is involved.

img-20161105-wa0013-2The lively discussion which followed touched upon many different issues and controversies triggered by the speakers, proving the complexity and multitude of perspectives that exist around the Great Lakes region conflict. Many causes for conflict were mentioned: weapons trade, bad leadership, Western involvement, the mining industry and the many social divisions among Africans. This should not lead to strengthen the tendency to victimization, but to an understanding that home-grown solutions are possible and that Africa needs the West as well as the West needs Africa. All-in-all it was a very fruitful exchange of views and a clear indication that more meetings and dialogue across group-boundaries are essential to make steps forward towards possible solutions. 

 

The role of media in Conflict and Peacebuilding in the Great Lakes Region

poster-grl-conferenceOn the 24th and 25th and 26th of November 2016, The Hague Peace Projects together with ISS is organizing a second Diaspora Conference on the Great Lakes Region with as main theme: “The role of media in conflict and peacebuilding”. We would hereby like to invite you for this event.

Order your tickets here.

The Hague Peace Projects tries to facilitate a positive environment in which dialogue among all parties is encouraged. Analyzing and discussing the conflict enables the diaspora communities to contribute to peacebuilding processes not only in their home countries, but also in their diaspora communities abroad.

Last year’s conference topic was “The root causes of conflicts in the Great Lakes Region”. It left rooms for discussion and dialogue, which is necessary in order to create unity among diaspora groups. This year’s conference will deepen the dialogue and understanding by focusing on this one specific topic.

The first day of the conference will be mainly about the function of media in the Great Lakes Region. While the second day will focus on the role of media in conflict and peacebuilding. The third and last day will be connecting the topic of media with the diaspora groups.

The schedule day 1 – Role of Media

10:00-10:30              Welcome & opening, Connie Formson (ADPC), Ewing Amadi Salumu, Jakob de Jonge (HPP)
10:30-11:00               Keynote speech 1: Media & democracy: RNW Media
11:00-11:30                Keynote speech 2: .Social media today : Sanne Kruikemeijer, assistant professor Political Communication at the Amsterdam School of Communication
11:30-11:45                Coffee break
11:45-12:15                Keynote speech 3: Media in the GLR; Olivier Nyiubugara, Lecturer Journalism Erasmus University Rotterdam
12:15-13:00               Panel discussion
13:00-14:00              Lunch
14:00-15:15               Working sessions; country by country, strengths weaknesses
15:15-15:30               Coffee break
15:30-16:00              Continuation working sessions
16:00-17:00              Plenary session; reports from working sessions

The schedule day 2 – Media in Conflict & Peace

10:00-11:00              Keynote speech 1 +questions: Media & Conflict; Marie-Soleil Frère, Director Research Center in Information and Communication, Université Libre de Bruxelles
11:00-11:30               Keynote speech 2: Dirk-Jan Koch, Special Envoy Natural Resources, Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs
11:30-11:45                Coffee break
11:45-12:00               Case speech 1: Moses Atocon, Blogger, Uganda
12:00-12:15               Case speech 2: Rwanda
12:15-12:30               Case speech 3: Burundi
12:30-12:45              Case speech 4: Marie-Louise Balagizi, DR Congo
12:45-13:45               Lunch
13:45-14:45              Panel discussion
14:45-16:00              workshops: YAGA & PAX
16:00-16:15               Coffee break
16:15-17:00                Continuation workshops 

The schedule for day 3: Diaspora and the perspectives of Media

10:00-10:15                Recap of the two days + questions/suggestions
10:15-10:45                Role of Diaspora;  Abubakar Koroma, International Organization for Migration
10:45-11:15                Diaspora & Media: Sennai Fessahaie, Eritrea diaspora
11:15-11:30                Coffee break
11:30-12:00               New Perspectives of Media; George Weiss, director Radio La Benevolencija
12:00-13:00               Panel discussion
13:00-14:00               Lunch
14:00-15:30               Afternoon program with own workshops
15:30-15:45                Coffee break
15:45-16:30                Continuation workshops
16:30-17:00                Closing words and conclusion conference
17:00-17:15                walks to HPP-office in separate groups
17:15-19:00                Dinner
19:00                           African party (at The Hague Peace Projects)

Where: International Institute of Social Sciences, The Hague
When : 24, 25 and 26 of November, 2016
Language: English

More information and the general outline of the days will follow.

Admission will be free for diaspora and students. For others the tickets are €20,- (payment at the door).Registration is required, reserve your seat here.

If you have questions, please contact us: info@thehaguepeace.org