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Nextview Event: From personal stories to concept-prototype

“I’ve never done it before. So I think I can do it.”

– Pippi Longstocking

 

By Nina Nout

We held our Nextview Event on June 19 surrounded by inspirational quotes in the beautiful workshop space of the Nextview Design Centre on the High Tech Campus in Eindhoven. We had the opportunity to collaborate with Nextview on this ideation session, an innovative company which specializes in combining design thinking and technology. With their expertise and know-how for the day, we designed the first concept-design of our Early Warning System prototype.  Needless to say, it was a very productive day!

We had the pleasure of welcoming people from a variety of fields, from human rights defenders, tech experts, designers, and interested students. Most of our team also attended the event, so we could collaborate with others to create a concept design for our Early Warning System technology.

We started the day with general information on the structure of the event and information about our projects. We also invited human rights defenders to speak about their lives and the importance of ethical technology to support human rights activism. After that, we split up into two groups. We dedicated the rest of the morning to the exploration phase, where we discussed the problem, context and the needs of human rights defenders.

 

Shucheesmita draws attention to important moments in her activist journey using a Journey Map.

 

We created journey maps based on the lived experiences of the human rights defenders present at the event. In one group, we followed the journey of a Bangladeshi feminist activist who became the target of human rights violations. We established the key points in her story and discussed how online harassment against her began and escalated.

In the other group, the journey map detailed the story of a man who shared his story from Islam to atheism online. The subsequent storm of online harassment caused him to quit social media for a number of years. After which, he began to build connections and communicate again on social media, this time more aware of the risks of his activism online and offline.

Even though both journey maps had different stories, we found some distinct similarities between the two stories. The journey maps showed that both human rights defender did not intentionally set out to become activists. Their first activity did not come from a political or activist point, but from personal experience and opinions. This meant that they became aware of the importance of safety and privacy online only at a later stage in their work. The lack of a trustworthy source of information about online safety and what actions to take when they received threats was a common theme in both stories.

Despite the similarities, there were also clear differences. An important point that became clearer during the conversations with human rights defenders was that every human rights defender had different experiences and a threshold for what they considered a “serious” threat.

The nuances that came to light during this day proved the importance of trans-disciplinary design sessions . Offering reliable tech solutions takes more than one hackathon. We need to think, discuss and adapt our projects constantly to bring the separate worlds of human rights and technology  together throughout the problem-solving process. Another quote that we were reminded of at Nextview is the old saying: “Rome wasn’t built in a day.” This is also why we need the infrastructure and resources to follow-up with the innovative ideas that come out of ideation sessions to transform them into concrete technologies.

 

One of the groups discuss the shape and characteristics of their Early Warning System technology concept-prototype.

Based on the journey maps, we began to design our tech solutions. Both groups designed variations of the Early Warning System technology. This technology takes into account the individual stories and viewpoints of human rights defenders but also monitors online trends and movements. We have since been busy with the development of these design ideas and have come up with a concept-prototype of the Early Warning System technology. Currently, we are working towards being able to make our first prototype.

Even though it’s summer we have not been sitting still on our other activities either. The Hague Hacks co-organized an informing session for the World Legal Summit on August 1st with The Humanity of Things and The Embassy of Canada to the Kingdom of the Netherlands. We were also invited to speak and educate a dynamic and talented group of youth from CISV about safe practices for activists on social media, as well as guide them through an ideation session to brainstorm new technologies for hate speech online. Several interesting ideas emerged, and the youth were excited about the possibility of seeing these ideas come to life!

We have also begun preparations for our third The Hague Hacks Festival this December. We’re very excited about this, and will update you on the latest news on our blog and our social media channels!

If you are interested in The Hague Hacks, or if you would like to learn more, collaborate, volunteer, or just want to drop a note, we’re happy to hear from you. Send us an email at haguehacks@thehaguepeace.org .

Design for Activism

By Nina Nout

On June 13, we had the pleasure of hosting our Design For Activism lab at the Border Sessions Festival. The goal of the lab was to design a workflow that creates opportunities for tech experts and companies to support human rights activists online. In other words, we wanted to find out how we can engage tech companies long term in order to establish and maintain a sustainable cooperation between human rights defenders and tech companies. In this lab, we also wanted to introduce people to the issues human rights defenders face online, from harassment and arbitrary banning to threats of violence.

We kicked off our lab by getting to know two human rights defenders from Rwanda and Pakistan. Their stories gave us insights into the complicated dynamics of online activism. Technology has been an incredibly powerful tool for them to communicate with others and raise awareness of human rights violations, but it has also exposed them to threats and harassment.

 

Karen van Luttervelt from We Are listens attentively to the stories of our human rights defenders.

 

Online harassment is a worrying trend, as a study conducted in the United States by Pew Research Center (2017) shows. According to Pew, 66% of adult internet users have seen online harassment and 41% have personally experienced it [1]. Among human rights defenders this number may be even higher, as they stand up for the rights of minority groups and victims, resist State and extremists attempts to silence them, and hold existing power structures accountable. Unfortunately, big tech companies have not yet made adequate steps to address and prevent online harassment. An Amnesty International report on online violence against women on Twitter explains: “The company’s failure to meet its responsibilities regarding violence and abuse means that many women are no longer able to express themselves freely on the platform without fear of violence or abuse.” [2]

During the Border Sessions Lab, we used the case of Twitter’s policy on online harassment to demonstrate the power imbalance that human rights defenders’ experiences. We addressed the lived experiences of one of our human rights defenders in detail during a role-play simulation. We divided the group into three smaller groups: human rights defenders, State actors, and Twitter, to discuss how Twitter currently handles online disputes between individuals and the government. This was followed by a discussion about how Twitter could additionally support human rights defenders on their platform. The main question that seemed to form during the discussion was how to translate freedom of expression to an online environment. This showed itself to be a multi-faceted problem. On the one hand Twitter gives human rights defenders a platform to voice their opinions. On the other, the platform enables people to harass and intimidate human rights defenders, as well as spread false information.

The exercise was eye-opening. As we moved further along in the discussion, our participants learned that tech companies frequently use freedom of expression as an excuse not to take action. We also discussed the technological aspects while retaining social understanding of the problem. Another interesting finding was that the human right defenders’ group was overshadowed by the arguments of Twitter and the government. A situation that is also so often the case in real life.

 

Steen Bentall, Head of The Hague Hacks, writes down points discussed during the brainstorming session.

After the simulation we took a short lunch break before we continued with the second part of the day. We split up into two groups to address the question ‘How do we engage tech companies?’. The morning had helped to create a basic understanding of the importance of tech to human rights, and so we built upon this idea during our brainstorming sessions.

We were very happy to see how motivated everyone was to discuss possible solutions. Both of the groups came up with some insightful practical steps and focus points on how to establish and maintain contact with tech companies. The knowledge we acquired from the brainstorm sessions is incredibly valuable. We will incorporate some of the findings into future collaborations with tech companies to ensure support for human rights defenders long-term.

This lab was another example of how important it is for people from different disciplines to come together and talk about tech and human rights. It helped us focus on possible ways of involving tech companies. Our Nextview event also had some great results. We will soon update you on that event too!

If you are interested in The Hague Hacks, or if you would like to learn more, collaborate, volunteer, or just want to drop a note, we’re happy to hear from you. Send us an email at haguehacks@thehaguepeace.org

 

 

References

[1] Online Harassment 2017. (2017). Pew Research Center.

[2] Toxic Twitter – A Toxic Place For Women. (n.d.). Amnesty International.

Meet The Hague Hacks: Connecting Tech and Human Rights

Written by Nina Nout

At The Hague Hacks, we’re all about connecting the worlds of peace and technology. From our annual The Hague Hack Festival, to our events, to building an innovative platform for creating new tech solutions to human rights issues; we are ‘hacking’ the landscape of human rights issues in collaboration with our extensive multidisciplinary network. We want to connect people from different backgrounds to solve human rights issues, and we’re excited to share our progress on this mission.

In December 2018, we brought people from the tech industry, human rights advocates, academics, diaspora members, students and designers for the second annual The Hague Hacks Festival. We unpacked and contextualized five human rights issues from five countries with the help of human rights defenders from those respective communities. Then, we brainstormed solutions to the pressing human rights issues in those countries. The event gave us a wealth of new ideas and perspectives. The Bangladesh group emerged with the strongest plausible tech solution, and we have since focused on developing their concept and collaborating with tech companies. You can read more about the event here.

 

It is becoming increasingly important to find tech solutions to human rights issues in Bangladesh. The number of internet users in Bangladesh has sky-rocketed, from 100,000 in 2000 to over 92 million people as of February 2019 [1, 2]. The rapid technological advancements and increased internet usage have provided an (inter)national platform for human rights activists, but have also resulted in a rise of online harassment and threats. Furthermore, the government is cracking down on privacy and freedom of expression online. International independent observers fear this is an attempt to limit free speech and criticism. [3, 4]

 

Our mission is to address these issues through technological and social solutions. In the last two years, we’ve built a team of inspiring human rights activists, researchers, designers and volunteers to work towards our goal. Since The Hague Hacks Festival, we have brought more people from different disciplines together to approach the issue of online censoring and oppression in Bangladesh from different angles.

 

Today, we are very happy to tell you more about our upcoming events, current research, and our activities.

 

Events

June will be an eventful month for us (literally!). On June 13, we’ll be at the Border Sessions Festival with our very own design lab to create a collective of tech companies and human rights defenders. We want to connect the human rights defenders urgently in need of tech-solutions with tech and design companies.

 

At the end of June, we are collaborating with Nextview for a closed design event at their Design Lab on the High Tech Campus in Eindhoven. The focus of this design session is to connect the tech industry with human rights activists to evaluate the tech solutions from Bangladesh group and begin development and prototyping.

 

We’re very excited for these events and the progress they will bring! The Nextview Event is closed, but we’re happy to welcome interested participants to our Border Sessions Event on June 13. So if you or someone you know of is a member of The Hague’s tech community, please get in touch via haguehacks[at]thehaguepeace.org. We’d love to hear from you!

 

 

Research

Over the last few months, members of our team have been conducting in-depth qualitative research about the issues human rights defenders in Bangladesh face online. This research is essential to validate the ideas that emerged from The Hague Hacks Festival, and ensure that any tech-solutions meet the needs of human rights defenders or aid the victims of human rights violations. Our preliminary results are both surprising and insightful. We’ve identified some key issues related to safe internet practices and online harassment. Given the sensitive nature of the information shared to us by human rights defenders, we will only release an overall conclusion of our observations. Keep an eye on our page for our upcoming post about this research.

 

Activities

Based on the findings of our qualitative research and past events, we are developing projects to support human rights activists in safe online practices. Aside from that, we are working on a video of The Hague Hacks Festival to capture the essence and energy of our organization. We also want to peak the interest of human rights defenders, problem-solvers, and passionate diaspora members. Finally, we are also collaborating with a few talented individuals in the creation of a new podcast that is coming to our site soon.

 

We’ll keep you updated here about our events, activities, and progress. We’ll also bring you the latest news about human rights, tech and the best internet practices to keep you safe. So, check in with us soon!

 

Fotografie Eelkje Colmjon.

 

If you are interested in The Hague Hacks, or if you would like to learn more, collaborate, volunteer or just want to drop a note, we’re happy to hear from you. Send us an email at haguehacks[at]thehaguepeace.org

 

References

  1. Asia Internet Stats by Country and 2019 Population Statistics. (2019). Internet World Stats.
  2. Study: Internet users in Bangladesh have increased 800x since 2000. (2018, October 23). Dhaka Tribute.
  3. Bangladesh: Crackdown on Social Media. (2018, October 19). HRW.
  4. Bangladesh’s new digital law will silence critics, rights groups say. (2018, October 9). CNN.

 

Letter to Special Rapporteur on contemporary forms of racism, concerning visit Morocco

20, December 2018

Ms. E. Tendayi Achiume
Special Rapporteur on
contemporary forms of racism,
racial discrimination, xenophobia
and related intolerance
Palais des Nations
CH-1211 Geneva 10
Switzerland

SUBJECT: visit to Morocco to assess racism, discrimination

Dear Ms. Tendayi Achiume,

On December 12th 2018 the United Nations Human Rights Consul (UNHRC) announced your visit to Morocco, a visit that will take place from 13 to 21 December 2018 to examine the country’s efforts to eliminate racial inequality and discrimination. We* are very pleased with
your visit to Morocco to discuss and examine those important themes in a country where it’s urgently needed. As the news item indicates, your visit will include the cities Rabat, Tangier, Tétouan, Agadir, and Casablanca. Unfortunately, none of these cities are located in the Rif
region where discrimination and racism are the most common.

ccording to the Moroccan news source Hespress several advocates for the Amazigh people and human rights organizations in Morocco highly recommended Al Hoceima and Nador, two cities in the Rif region to be visited by the special rapporteur, due its historical and very
bad relationship between the central Arab government and the indigenous inhabitants of the Rif region the Imazighen also known as ‘Berbers’. Unfortunately, we read in the same news source you’ve decided not to visit the two cities in the Rif region. We consider this as a very unwise and harmful decision, we would like to comment more on this point.

The Rif region and its inhabitants experience racism, discrimination, oppression and marginalization by the Arab government for decades. The recent example can be found in the Hirak movement, a movement which can be compared to the Arab spring. During the Hirak
movement many young men, elderly and women were mistreated by the authorities. They were beaten, some of them were killed, others were raped and discriminated for being an Amazigh and demanding social-economical rights. The Rifians in the city of Al Hoceima where
the Hirak movement started, were not able to demonstrate nor to speak up against the injustice of the authorities. Even the women were not able to held a march on the international women’s day. Those who tried to demonstrate were beaten up by the police and
have been arrested.

Not to mention on the 24th of November 1958 when the city of Al Hoceima was declared by the Moroccan authorities as a military zone. Entering the city of Al-Hoceima involves passing highly militarized checkpoints, which makes segregation and disparities justified through
ethnic rhetoric.

We urge you as the special rapporteur to involve the city of Al Hoceima and Nador in your mission. We believe this is the only way to do justice to your observations and recommendations about Morocco’s efforts on Racism and discrimination.

Respectfully,

*Letter singned by: Anzuf; Marokkaanse Vrouwen Vereniging Nederland; The Hague Peace Projects; Syphax Foundation; GroenLinks Amsterdam; New Urban Collective; Bij1; Humanistisch Verbond; SP Amsterdam.

See here the letter in pdf.

Brief aan minister Blok over situatie in de Rif

De Tweede Kamer der Staten-Generaal
Vaste commissie Buitenlandse Zaken
De Lange Poten 4, 2511 CL Den Haag
Aan de minister van Buitenlandse Zaken
drs. S.A. Blok
Amsterdam, 28 juni 2018

Geachte heer Blok,

Vandaag vindt in de Vaste Commissie Buitenlandse Zaken het Algemeen Overleg Marokko plaats. Tijdens dit overleg zal de situatie in Marokko en de Westelijke Sahara aan de orde komen. Zoals u wellicht heeft vernomen zijn eergisteren rond middernacht de vonnissen van de Riffijnse gewetensgevangenen in Marokko uitgesproken. Vonnissen variërend tussen 2 en 20 jaar celstraf, zie bijgesloten bijlage voor een overzicht van de vonnissen. Vonnissen die ons, de families van de Riffijnse gewetensgevangenen in Marokko voor de rest van ons leven hebben getekend. Vanuit de Marokkaanse gemeenschap juichen wij uiteraard elk debat dat tot doel heeft om de situatie in Marokko te verbeteren toe. Echter willen wij een aantal kanttekeningen plaatsen bij onder andere
uw brief van 21 juli jongstleden en stilstaan bij uw toekomstbeeld als vertegenwoordiger van de Staat der Nederlanden over Marokko.

In uw brief geeft u aan dat Nederland een speciale band heeft met Marokko in verband met de ca. 400.000 Nederlanders met Marokkaanse wortels. Echter, deze groep Marokkaanse-Nederlanders wordt grotendeels gevormd door Marokkanen die hun wortels hebben in de Rif. Een regio dat tot vandaag de dag stelselmatig wordt onderdrukt en achtergesteld. In april heeft u een werkbezoek gebracht aan Marokko om onder meer aandacht te vragen voor de situatie in de Rif, helaas hebben wij u weinig horen zeggen over de situatie van uw collega’s Kati Piri en Lilianne Ploumen die twee weken voor uw bezoek de toegang tot de stad Al Hoceima zijn ontzegd en hun werkbezoek vroegtijdig moesten verbreken. Ook vinden wij het jammer dat u zelf niet een bezoek heeft gebracht aan de Rif om de situatie met eigen ogen te zien. Wij zijn dan ook verbaasd over het aantal zinnen dat u in de brief heeft toegewijd aan de situatie in de Rif. En in het
bijzonder de mensenrechtenschendingen in de regio.

Mensenrechtenschendingen

Zoals u weet wordt de Rif (de omgeving rondom de stad Al Hoceima) al bijna twee jaar gemarginaliseerd en onderdrukt door de centrale overheid. Meer dan 2000 onschuldige burgers voornamelijk jongeren moesten het ontgelden. Een deel daarvan heeft zijn celstraf uitgezet, anderen zijn weer in voorarrest. De arrestaties en ontvoeringen zijn echter niet gestopt en gaan tot de dag van vandaag ongestoord door. Voor ons is het onbegrijpelijk dat u kansen ziet in een land dat (inter)nationale wetgeving en verdragen meermaals heeft geschonden. Verschillende mensenrechtenorganisaties hebben meerdere keren gerapporteerd over de structurele martelingen, verkrachtingen, mishandelingen en vernederingen die de gevangenen hebben moeten doorstaan. Amnesty International heeft op 22 juni 2017 gerapporteerd over de mishandelingen van onder andere de protestleider Nasser Zafzafi. Ook Human Rights Watch heeft op 5 september 2017 gerapporteerd over de mensenrechtenschendingen door de politieagenten, de schendingen zijn zelfs bevestigd door de medische rapporten van de Marokkaanse mensenrechtenraad National des Droits de l’Homme (CNDH) waar de heer Al Yazami de voorzitter van is. De medische rapporten zijn echter nooit openbaar gemaakt.

De protestleider Nasser Zafzafi zit al meer dan een jaar in eenzame opsluiting, een schending dat alle boekjes te buiten gaat. Volgens Artikel 44 van ‘The United Nations Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners’ mag een gevangene niet meer dan 15 dagen opeenvolgend in de isoleercel verblijven. Amnesty International heeft op 28 november 2017 haar zorgen geuit over de toen 176 dagen die Nasser Zafzafi in de isoleercel heeft doorgebracht. Dat houdt in meer dan 22 uur zonder contact met medegevangene, beperkte vrijheden en in een kleine en onhygiënische ruimte verblijven. Ook de persvrijheid en vrijheid van meningsuiting waar Nederland veel waarde aan hecht worden in Marokko meermaals geschonden. Meerdere journalisten zijn sinds de protesten in de Rif opgepakt. De Marokkaanse autoriteiten blokkeren door juridische en fysieke intimidaties elk kritisch geluid van binnenlandse en buitenlandse journalisten. In the World Press Freedom Index staat Marokko van de 180 landen op de 135ste plek, een land dat in 5 jaar tijd twee plaatsen is gezakt als het gaat om de persvrijheid. Hoe kan Nederland op alle terreinen breed willen investeren in een land dat haar eigen democratische waarden niet respecteert?

Subsidiegelden

Het is goed om te lezen dat Nederland voornemens is om te investeren in de economische ontwikkeling van Marokko, minder fijn is om te zien dat dit soort investeringen nauwelijks of deels ten goede komt aan de juiste doelgroepen. Marokko kent nog altijd een hoge corruptie-index. Verder valt ons op dat Nederland ervoor kiest om projecten te starten in de ontwikkelde steden van Marokko zoals Rabat en Tanger. Zoals wij aan het begin van de brief hebben aangegeven komt de grootse groep Marokkaanse Nederlanders uit het hart van de Rif, het gebied dat door onze ouders is verlaten omdat het economisch erbarmelijk aan toeging. Het is zeer spijtig om in uw brief te lezen dat Nederland steeds dezelfde fout maakt, namelijk de kloof tussen de ontwikkelde steden zoals Rabat en Tanger waar de Orange Corners worden gevestigd en de steden die de subsidiegelden het hardst nodig hebben groter wordt gemaakt. Wij vinden het ook jammer dat Nederland de subsidie voor het Shiraka-programma dat onderdeel is van het Nederlandse Fonds voor Regionale Partnerschappen (NFRP) dat ten doel dient het bevorderen van het democratisch bestel in de MENA-regio met vier jaar is verlengd tot 2022. Het is vooral spijtig omdat het geld zelden wordt geïnvesteerd in projecten in de Rif of terecht komt bij de juiste mensen. Naar ons mening dient Nederland toezicht te houden en onderzoek te doen naar alle projecten in Marokko die zij financieel ondersteunt en erop toeziet dat het geld ook toekomt aan de kwetsbare steden in de Rif.

Vervolgstappen

In uw brief stelt u vast dat Marokkaanse Nederlanders zich geen zorgen hoeven te maken om gearresteerd te worden in Marokko, mits zij de Marokkaanse wetgeving niet overtreden. Hetzelfde hebben wij vernomen van de Nederlandse Ambassadrice in Marokko mevrouw Bonis. Wij de familieleden van de gewetensgevangenen worden direct en indirect via onze familieleden in de gevangenis bedreigd en geïntimideerd. Om die reden maken wij ondanks de garanties vanuit de Marokkaanse autoriteiten ons zorgen over ons lot. Zolang deze mondelinge toezegging op geen enkel juridische grondslag is berust en wordt ondersteund, zullen wij ons onveilig voelen. Wij hopen dan ook dat u mede namens de Minister voor Buitenlandse Handel en Ontwikkelingssamenwerking de Marokkaanse autoriteiten zal vragen om deze mondelinge toezegging hard te maken.

Verder willen wij graag van u weten of u op de hoogte bent van de valse beschuldigingen van de Marokkaanse autoriteiten richting de Riffijnse activisten? Namelijk dat zij worden beschuldigd van separatisme. Een beschuldiging waar volgens de Marokkaanse wet levenslang op staat.

Tot slot zijn wij benieuwd naar uw vervolgstappen inzake de situatie in de Rif. Wat kunnen de Marokkaanse Nederlanders van u concreet verwachten? Tevens hopen wij als bezorgde Nederlandse staatsburgers met Marokkaanse wortels met u als minister van Buitenlandse Zaken in gesprek te gaan. Uiteraard hopen wij op korte termijn een uitnodiging van u te mogen ontvangen.

Hoogachtend,

Namens de families van de Riffijnse gewetensgevangenen in Marokko.
Farida Houdoe – Zus van protestleider gewetensgevangene Abdelali Houdoe in de gevangenis van Oukacha te
Casablanca
Imad Maghouh – Broer van Mohamed maghouh gewetensgevangene in de gevangenis van Oukacha te Casablanca
Ibrahim Iamrachen – Broer van gewetensgevangene Mortada Iamrachen gevangenis in Taza
Oualid Mallorca – Neef van de protestleider Nasser Zafzafi in de gevangenis van Oukacha te Casablanca

Overzicht vonnissen uitgesproken door de rechtbank te Casablanca tegen de Riffijnse
gewetensgevangenen op 27 juni 2018.

1. Nasser Zafzafi 20 jaar
2. Mohamed Elmajjaoui 5 jaar
3. Nabil Ahamjik 20 jaar
4. Mohamed Jelloul 10 jaar
5. Samir Ighid 20 jaar
6. Mahmoud Ahannouch 15 jaar
7. Rachid Aamarouch 10 jaar
8. Mohamed Asrihi 5 jaar
9. Elhaki 15 jaar
10. Zakaria Adahchour 15 jaar
11. Bilal Ahabad 10 jaar
12. Jamal Bouhaddou 10 jaar
13. Achraf Elyakhloufi 5 jaar
14. Othman Bouzian 3 jaar
15. Mohamed Naimi 3 jaar
16. Anas Elkhattabi 2 jaar
17. Fahim Ghattas 2 jaar
18. Mohsin Athari 2 jaar
19. Rabie Ablake 5 jaar
20. Youssef Elhamdioui 3 jaar
21. Ilyas Elhaji 5 jaar
22. Mohamed Elhani 3 jaar
23. Chakir Elmakhrout 5 jaar
24. Salah Lakhchem 10 jaar
25. Ibrahim Bouzian 3 jaar
26. Badr Boulahjal 2 jaar
27. Ahmed Elhakimi 2 jaar
28. Abdelaziz Khali 2 jaar
29. Jamal Mona 2 jaar
30. Fouad Saidi 3 jaar
31. Jaouad Sabiri 2 jaar
32. Jaouad Benzian 2 jaar
33. Ibrahim Abeqqouy 5 jaar
34. Soleiman Elfahili 5 jaar
35. Karim Amghar 10 jaar
36. Ahmed Hazzat 2 jaar
37. Mohamed Meggouh 2 jaar
38. Mohamed Elmahdali 3 jaar
39. Abdelali Houdoe 5 jaar
40. Hassan El Idrissi 5 jaar
41. Omar Bouhras 10 jaar
42. Wassim El Bousattati. 20 jaar
43. Abdelkhair Elyasnari 2 jaar
44. Abdelhak Sadik 2 jaar
45. Monaim Asartiho 2000 Dirham

Events

The Hague Hacks Festival

Welcome to The Hague Hacks Festival 2019

Set Free!

The Hague Hacks strives to bridge the gap between human rights and technology. We facilitate and connect a range of trans-disciplinary actors, to create and/or develop technology that empowers human rights defenders (H.R.D.s) and improves the safety and freedom of victims of human rights violations. The Hague Hacks Festival is our main ideation (idea creation) event of the year. We create a trans-disciplinary space where human rights defenders share their experiences and unpack human rights violations in their communities.

At The Hague Hacks Festival, we bring together tech experts, software developers, designers, engineers, etc., as well as H.R.D.s and diaspora members together. This plurality of perspectives enriches the problem-solving process and leads to innovative new tech ideas for human rights advocacy. We believe that these connections and ideas would never have occurred outside of our Festival Ideation sessions, and that is why our goal is to be that bridge between the worlds of peace and technology.

This year’s theme for the Festival is Set Free: Tech to Empower Human Rights and Freedoms. We will be focusing on four challenges to human rights and freedoms: Political Participation (Nicaragua), Gender Inequality (Bangladesh), Peace Education (Netherlands, Northern Ireland, Turkey/Kurdistan, North Korea), and Right to Expression and Association (Hong Kong).

All of our workshops are facilitated by human rights defenders, tech experts, and community leaders. We highly recommend that you register for workshops in advance. Learn more about The Hague Hacks Festival 2019 by clicking the link.

Watch the excitement of last year’s festival!