Posts

Sudan: In response to nation-wide protests, Omar al-Bashir declares a state of emergency and dissolves the government

On the 22nd of February 2019 Sudan’s president – Omar al-Bashir, dissolved the government and declared a state of emergency for one year. He addressed the nation on television by saying “I announce imposing a state of emergency across the country for one year and dissolving the government at the federal level and at the provincial levels.” Essentially, he warned his people of potential chaos dramatically similar to the one of the Arab Spring protests leading to massive civil wars in states like Yemen, Syria and Libya. Moreover, he invited the parliament to postpone the scheduled constitutional amendments that would have permitted him to run for yet another mandate next year. Omar al-Bashir is a former army officer and an Islamist who managed to seize power in 1989 through a coup d’etat. Ever since, he has consistently refused to step down (Deutsche Welle “Sudan’s Bashir”).

Recently, al-Bashir has been presented with the most sustained challenge to his long-standing  rule – a multitude of widespread protests. Anti-government rebels have raged in the capital of Sudan – Khartoum, as well as in other towns all across the country in an effort to push the president to withdraw from his post, after holding a firm grip of power for thirty consecutive years. Initially, the uprisings started as an opposition to the increased prices but have since transformed into the greatest challenge to al-Bashir’s rule. The protests erupted in December 2018 and took the lives of nearly 60 people in violent clashes of civilians with security and forces. However, the government claims the death toll is lower, placing the number at 32. In an effort to crack down on the uprisings, the National Intelligence and Security Service detained hundreds of rebels and activists, arrested journalists and oppositional leaders. Nevertheless, the Sudanese Professionals Association, who is leading the uprisings, replied to the president’s announcement of state of emergency by pushing him to step down immediately: “We are calling on our people to continue with demonstrations until the main aim of this uprising, which is the stepping down of the regime chief, is achieved” (Deutsche Welle “Sudan’s Bashir”).

As a matter of fact, in October 2007 the US removed a long-standing trade embargo on Sudan that lasted for twenty years. This move was expected to ameliorate Sudan’s otherwise desperate economic situation, which worsened significantly upon the gaining of independence of South Sudan. The latter took place in 2011 as a result of a decades-long civil war. It led to the loss of one third of Sudan’s overall oil wealth. This forced the ruling elite of Sudan to seek support from gas-rich Turkey and Qatar (Deutsche Welle “Wave of Protests”). The split between north and south inevitably brought about major economic repercussions for Sudan as a whole, where the economic system collapsed ever since. Chronic shortages of fuel and other inelastic basic goods were a commonplace with steadily rising prices for bread (Deutsche Welle “Anger over Dictatorship”).

In that regard, the primary reason for the emergence of the protest movements was the threefold raise of bread prices. Starting as a context-specific issue of discontent, these uprisings developed into a widespread expression of a broader dissatisfaction of the general population with the rapidly deteriorating economic conditions in the country and ,crucially, al-Bashir’s thirty-year rule. On his part, the president labeled the protesters “infiltrators” for presenting an immense and unprecedented challenge to his autocratic rule. Therefore, security and government forces forcefully and violently cracked down on the demonstrations by deploying tear gas, live ammunitions and stun grenades in an effort to bring the movement to an end (Deutsche Welle “Wave of Protests”).

Notably, the protesters have been calling for peace, justice and freedom, and essentially an end to the decades-old military dictatorship bringing about human rights abuses, killings and economic grievances. However, even though the demonstrations in Sudan have been deemed to resemble the Arab Spring movements, they are found to share little similarities. For the most part, the Sudanese people are not partaking in an orchestrated demonstration but rather move spontaneously and in their own way. They have used the Arab Spring chant of “The people want to bring down the regime” but, arguably, there have been few points of comparison to be reasonably made between the Arab revolution and the Sudanese uprising (Deutsche Welle “Anger over Dictatorship”).

References:

Deutsche Welle. Anger over Dictatorship, Not Bread, Fueling Sudan Uprising | DW | 29.12.2018. www.dw.com. Available at: https://www.dw.com/en/anger-over-dictatorship-not-bread-fueling-sudan-uprising/a-46894036. (Accessed February 26, 2019).

Deutsche Welle. Sudan’s Bashir Declares State of Emergency, Dissolves Government as Protests Mount | DW | 22.02.2019. www.dw.com. Available at: https://www.dw.com/en/sudans-bashir-declares-state-of-emergency-dissolves-government-as-protests-mount/a-47643590. (Accessed February 25, 2019).

Deutsche Welle. Wave of Protests Rock Sudan, at Least One Dead | DW | 24.01.2019. www.dw.com. Available at: https://www.dw.com/en/wave-of-protests-rock-sudan-at-least-one-dead/a-47224745. (Accessed February 26, 2019).

One Young World Community Dinner

One Young World community dinner went down on the eve of 19th October, 2018. The visit included 25 One Young World delegates (from Germany, Switzerland, Belize, Republic of Moldova, Singapore, Bangladesh, Ireland, Hong Kong, Spain, Belgium,The United States, Argentina, Sierra Leone, Portugal and Monaco) who were very inspirational in their thinking and demeanor. Our special visit that evening came from: Deputy Mayor Saskia Bruines, The Hague’s alderman for Education, Knowledge Economy and International Affairs. The director of The Hague Peace Projects, Jakob de Jonge welcomed the invited guests giving them a warm introduction.

One Young World 2018 delegates got to interact on with The Hague Peace Projects on a wealth of topics. Key on the discussion table were areas that focused on – peace and dialogue in various conflict areas such as : Syria, Turkey, Kurdistan, Bangladesh, The Democratic Republic of Congo – DRC, Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, Sudan and Somalia. The evening gave the One Young World delegates in attendance, clear insights of dealing with conflict areas by the use of various projects centered on education and culture, media and journalism and research and advocacy. An emphasis on clarity to the situation on ground were demonstrated by selected speakers.

In attendance were the founders of the Yangambi Foundation – Angélique Mbundu and Dady Kiyangi, Katrina Burch of the Hague Hacks, Ewing Ahmed Salumu– Congolese Journalist, Valentin Akayezu- Human Rights Lawyer and Activist, Alena Kahle – Bangladesh- work group writer.

Catering credits  went to Ya_Laziz Catering who made sure the One Young World delegates had a delightful feast and pleasant ambience.

Images right below:

Valentin Akayezu Human Rights Lawyer, addressing the crowd.

One Young World delegates

Ewing Ahmed Salumu, Congolese expert journalist and Angelique Mbundu, founder of Yangambi Foundation

 

Angelique Mbundu, OYW delegate and Dady Kiyangi

 

Deputy Mayor of The Hague, Saskia Bruines and Jakob de Jonge, Director of The Hague Peace Projects.

One Young World delegates listening in to the address.

 

OYW delegates have a chat before their last course.

Smiles that tell it all. ( From the left: Jakob de Jonge, Dir. The Hague Peace Projects, OYW delegates and Deputy Mayor of The Hague, Saskia Bruines.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Justin Kabika Congolese expert (right) and OYW delegate for Belize, Kylah Ciego.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Catering initiative, Ya Laziz, that savored the OYW diner’s taste buds – Instagram handle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Catering Credits: Ya Laziz

#Ya_Laziz_ Catering

@YaLazizCatering

 

Menu

——

Starters

Lentil soup with Turkish bread

Main Course

Yoghurt & cucumber

Moussaka

Rice, biryani flavor + nuts

Fatoush, Syrian Salad

Dessert

Mhalabe

Traditional rice pudding!

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Guest Program :

7.30pm – Guests coming in – Welcome refreshments

7.45pm – Welcome word ( Dir. The Hague Peace Projects – Jakob de Jonge)

–  Special honor visit  ( Deputy Mayor,The Hague – Saskia Bruines)

7.50pm –  Starter course – 1st presentation at the end the course – (Kitchen/Restaurant Team) – (Mohammed, Yasmine and Linde -welcome and-Ya Laziz- project background)

8.10pm– Dinner- (main course) – Hello and welcome mention from our team at Hague Peace Projects end the course

– Hague Hacks – Katrina

-Ewing, Valentine ( diaspora influence) + special guest : Angelique Mbundu and Dady Kiyangi  -iAfrica Film Festival and Yangambi Foundation-iAFF

-Green economy- Alena Kahel

9.00pm – Dessert + tea/coffee

9.10pm – Question and Answer session + Interactions (OYWs + The Hague Peace Projects Team)

-The question of and quest of/for Peace

-Green economy

-Talking change

-The Hague Hacks -technology + justice and peace

9.55pm– Vote of thanks ( Jakob de Jonge)

10.00pm– Guests leave at their own leisure

 

 

 

 

 

 

Events

Nothing Found

Sorry, no posts matched your criteria